Restaurant Service – Mango Mikes http://mangomikes.com/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 09:03:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://mangomikes.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Restaurant Service – Mango Mikes http://mangomikes.com/ 32 32 Texas restaurant closes after staff leave for $ 5,000 pay rise: labor shortage https://mangomikes.com/texas-restaurant-closes-after-staff-leave-for-5000-pay-rise-labor-shortage/ https://mangomikes.com/texas-restaurant-closes-after-staff-leave-for-5000-pay-rise-labor-shortage/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 07:40:59 +0000 https://mangomikes.com/texas-restaurant-closes-after-staff-leave-for-5000-pay-rise-labor-shortage/ A Texas taco restaurant has closed because it couldn’t find enough staff due to the labor shortage, its owner said. Staff were poached by larger companies and job applicants did not show up for interviews, he said. Restaurant staff left the industry in search of better wages and benefits. Loading Something is loading. A taco […]]]>
  • A Texas taco restaurant has closed because it couldn’t find enough staff due to the labor shortage, its owner said.
  • Staff were poached by larger companies and job applicants did not show up for interviews, he said.
  • Restaurant staff left the industry in search of better wages and benefits.

A taco restaurant in Texas has closed after it was left with just three kitchen workers, its owner told Insider.

Paul Horton, the owner of Taco Crush in McKinney, about 30 miles north of Dallas, said big companies poached some of his employees by offering much higher salaries or benefits.

“I know we’ve lost half a dozen who were offered an extra $ 5,000 a year to go elsewhere,” he said.

“Or even just benefits – being a small independent business, I can’t compete with the salaries of big companies, let alone offer them benefits,” he added. He didn’t name the biggest companies he said poached his staff.

When asked what he paid staff, Horton said it was “a reasonable salary”, without elaborating.

Restaurant staff left the industry in search of better wages, benefits and working conditions, leading some restaurants to raise prices, cut hours, limit services, or shut down permanently.

The labor shortage in the United States has affected other industries as well, with some business owners blaming a lack of desire to work. Workers, meanwhile, say they don’t need to take low-paying jobs in such a competitive job market.

Horton said some of his new hires will drop out within weeks of taking office. Each new hire meant more training – as a result, the quality of the food dropped because interns sometimes made mistakes, he said.

Horton said it had become “literally unsure or viable to continue to maintain operations” after losing all but three of his kitchen workers.

Horton said when he started scheduling he realized that these employees would each have to work 80 or 90 hours a week and even then service would be slow.

“At a minimum to cover the shifts we needed six people, but to operate effectively and efficiently we needed eight or nine people,” he said.

Horton said he spent thousands of dollars advertising on job boards like Indeed, but only about 10% of applicants responded to him after trying to set up an interview.

Of those with whom he scheduled interviews, only 5-10% showed up, he said. Other restaurants also said some candidates did not come to the interviews.

“You can’t be choosy anymore,” said Horton. “Basically, you hire anybody who shows up.”

A McDonald’s in Oregon is calling on 14-year-olds to apply for jobs, while a restaurant manager in Virginia said she hired people with bad attitudes because she was in desperate need of staff.

Do you own or manage a restaurant that has trouble finding staff? Or are you a hospitality worker who quit your job – or the industry – because of your pay, benefits, or working conditions? Contact this reporter at gdean@insider.com.

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ResTech Startup Sunday Secures $ 100 Million Funding https://mangomikes.com/restech-startup-sunday-secures-100-million-funding/ https://mangomikes.com/restech-startup-sunday-secures-100-million-funding/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 17:13:14 +0000 https://mangomikes.com/restech-startup-sunday-secures-100-million-funding/ On Wednesday September 22, the London-based restaurant payment solutions start-up announced that it had generated $ 100 million in Series A equity. Coatue, along with partners from DST Global and several other investors in the industry. hospitality, catering, hospitality and technology, led the final round, according to an emailed statement on Sunday. The funds will […]]]>

On Wednesday September 22, the London-based restaurant payment solutions start-up announced that it had generated $ 100 million in Series A equity. Coatue, along with partners from DST Global and several other investors in the industry. hospitality, catering, hospitality and technology, led the final round, according to an emailed statement on Sunday.

The funds will be used to accelerate growth, in part by doubling its workforce over the next year, according to the company. In addition, Sunday intends to expand its geographic presence and recruitment in Europe and North America, integrate 100 point of sale (POS) systems by the end of 2022 and add 15,000 restaurants by the end of next year. .

The 5-month-old company decided to change the way customers pay in restaurants by introducing its QR-based payment offering. With its latest round of funding – the second since its creation – Sunday plans to extend its offer to the mass market.

“This new round of investment is a remarkable opportunity for Sunday to build a powerful technology stack and develop new product features such as ordering and loyalty programs,” said Christine de Wendel, co-founder and CEO of United States to Sunday.

In an effort to simplify the process of paying restaurant customers’ bills, Sunday designed a payment system that has been launched to date in over 1,500 restaurants, representing an annual transaction volume of over $ 1 billion. dollars. As of today, Sunday has 1.1 million users. Since the company’s founding, Sunday has expanded its workforce with the hiring of 170 employees in the United States, United Kingdom, Spain, France and Canada, according to the press release.

Sunday isn’t the only catering technology provider on the cusp of growth. Service point provider Toast priced its initial public offering (IPO) above the range at $ 40 per share, taking the platform’s estimated valuation to $ 20 billion, as reported by reported PYMNTS. The IPO follows the 125% increase in the company’s gross payments volume in the second quarter of this year.

Read More: ResTech POS Startup Toast Valuates Shares At $ 40 Each For A $ 20 Billion Valuation

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NEW PYMNTS DATA: TODAY’S SELF-SERVICE PURCHASE JOURNEY – SEPTEMBER 2021

On: Eighty percent of consumers want to use non-traditional payment options like self-service, but only 35 percent were able to use them for their most recent purchases. Today’s Self-Service Shopping Journey, a PYMNTS and Toshiba Collaboration, analyzes more than 2,500 responses to find out how merchants can address availability and perception issues to meet demand for self-service kiosks.


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Bar cuts in-person service over abuse of anti-COVID-19 restrictions https://mangomikes.com/bar-cuts-in-person-service-over-abuse-of-anti-covid-19-restrictions/ https://mangomikes.com/bar-cuts-in-person-service-over-abuse-of-anti-covid-19-restrictions/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 22:41:15 +0000 https://mangomikes.com/bar-cuts-in-person-service-over-abuse-of-anti-covid-19-restrictions/ Breadcrumb Links Local News Thompson said his decision to adopt the REP was made to ensure the survival of his business and the safety of the public – intentions that do not deserve the hateful backlash. Author of the article: Bill Kaufmann Release date : Sep 21, 2021 • 1 hour ago • 4 minutes […]]]>

Thompson said his decision to adopt the REP was made to ensure the survival of his business and the safety of the public – intentions that do not deserve the hateful backlash.

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A Calgary-area bar owner says abusive customers opposed to COVID-19 vaccine passports forced him to shut down restaurant services.

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Greg Thompson said threats and intimidation directed at him and staff caused him to abandon plans for the regular operations of his Langdon Firehouse Bar & Grill in the town just east of Calgary.

He said his choice to screen clients for immunization status under the Restriction Waiver Program (REP) which went into effect on Monday has led to withered abuse that has left their physical safety in doubt.

“This past weekend we were inundated with threats and intimidation, both in person and online. It was for the owner group and the staff, ”Thompson said on Facebook Monday.

“We feel that our safety and that of our staff is in danger! “

From Tuesday, the bar – well known for its live music – will only revert to take-out after announcing on Friday that it will adopt the REP to operate with virtually no restrictions.

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Thompson said his decision was aimed at ensuring the survival of his business and the safety of the public – intentions that do not deserve the hateful backlash.

“We stayed in constant contact with the community and did our best not to choose a side. We’ve always tried to do what’s right for the community, our people and this business, ”he said.

On Tuesday, Thompson said: “As we move forward, we believe we have addressed most of our concerns but still need to be concerned about safety to keep our staff and customers safe.”

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Since making the move, which he says is temporary, Thompson said he has heard other bars and restaurants repel similar anger attacks, adding “this is not just a personal attack on the fire station. firefighters, it is against the whole industry “.

Calgary pub owner Ernie Tsu also said vitriol is rife in the industry and his own business has not been spared.

“Of course, we get them daily,” said an angry Tsu, president of the Alberta Hospitality Association and owner of Trolley 5 Community Brewpub.

After the financial and psychological toll suffered by his industry during the pandemic, he said the bullying was particularly unacceptable, but called it a by-product of the province’s refusal to impose vaccine passports, which leaves critics to target businesses, he said.

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“I will no longer sit idly by and see people lost to mental health issues losing everything they own and having to shut down their businesses,” he said.

“People should go after their MPs, not their local neighbors. . . we just need to remind Albertans that it is either about doing the REP or closing our doors.

Trolley 5 Restaurant and brewery owner Ernie Tsu.
Trolley 5 Restaurant and brewery owner Ernie Tsu. Photo by Darren Makowichuk / Postmedia

Mayor Naheed Nenshi also criticized the province’s refusal to make REP mandatory, saying it leaves companies exposed to attack for having to choose to pass the measure.

“It’s cruel to these entrepreneurs who have been through so much,” he said last week.

“Why not just make it easier by saying ‘you have to be vaccinated to go to a restaurant’. “

On Tuesday, Nenshi said he was calling a special city council meeting to draft a bylaw making this process mandatory and streamlined.

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The owner of the Dickens Pub at 1000 9th Ave. SW, echoed these sentiments, saying that “the government has approached this issue in typical UCP style – backwards.”

Chris Hewitt said when he decided to demand proof of vaccine three weeks ago, he was met with a torrent of bullying online and over the phone.

“The vast majority of our customers were thrilled, but this vocal minority can be very vicious – it’s amazing how harsh they can be,” he said, adding that the anger at the door was minimal.

But he said that has since diminished, adding that with the vast majority of companies opting for REP, strength in numbers would deter abuse.

“If we’ve done it alone and (this abuse) hasn’t happened a lot, then it’s not going to happen in every place,” Hewitt said.

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The Firehouse Bar & Grill in Langdon, east of Calgary, has temporarily suspended in-person service after receiving threats about the province's new vaccine passport.
The Firehouse Bar & Grill in Langdon, east of Calgary, has temporarily suspended in-person service after receiving threats about the province’s new vaccine passport. Photo by Jim Wells / Postmedia

Calgary Police said they had not received any harassment complaints from businesses.

The Calgary area isn’t alone in having opponents of COVID-19 restrictions harassing companies that enforce them.

Authorities in the town of Winkler in southern Manitoba have expressed anger and frustration at the widespread targeting of restaurateurs, retailers and law enforcement personnel.

“Overall, the animosity of this community that has emerged during this pandemic has crippled our integrity,” Winkler Police Department Chief Ryan Hunt said in a statement last weekend.

Hunt said some residents have also accused officials of not enforcing public health restrictions tightly enough, revealing a deep rift within his community.

BKaufmann@postmedia.com

Twitter: @BillKaufmannjrn

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Carolina Family Restaurant in Charlotte NC on standby since 1976 https://mangomikes.com/carolina-family-restaurant-in-charlotte-nc-on-standby-since-1976/ https://mangomikes.com/carolina-family-restaurant-in-charlotte-nc-on-standby-since-1976/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 10:30:00 +0000 https://mangomikes.com/carolina-family-restaurant-in-charlotte-nc-on-standby-since-1976/ The chef of the Carolina Family Restaurant prepares a breakfast plate with bacon and eggs. Alex Cason Photography Charlotte five READ MORE Charlotte’s classic dishes As new restaurants open every day in Charlotte, it’s easy to forget the old hangouts, the places that grew up alongside the Queen City. Our Charlotte’s Classic Eats series shines […]]]>

title=

The chef of the Carolina Family Restaurant prepares a breakfast plate with bacon and eggs.

Charlotte five

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Charlotte’s classic dishes

As new restaurants open every day in Charlotte, it’s easy to forget the old hangouts, the places that grew up alongside the Queen City. Our Charlotte’s Classic Eats series shines a light on the places you’ve visited for years, reminding us why they’ve stood the test of time.

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I must have walked past the modest brick building over a hundred times over the years. After entering the Carolina Family restaurant recently, I wish I had stopped earlier. The old school, unpretentious vibes hit me immediately, making me feel more like Mayberry than a bustling city struggling with growing pains.

Many Charlotte residents, myself included, pass the Carolina Family Restaurant most often on their way down Wilkinson Boulevard to or from Charlotte Douglas International Airport.

“When my dad bought this building in 1976, Wilkinson was a huge thoroughfare,” Maria Kotros, who runs the restaurant, told CharlotteFive. “He heard Harvey Gantt talk about revitalizing the West Side and was excited to open a restaurant here. “

The restaurant at 4600 Wilkinson Blvd. was not his first, however. Kotros’ father owned and operated Eat Well Grill on Trade Street in the 1950s and Pete’s Grill on South Boulevard in the 1960s and 1970s.

It wasn’t until Pepsi Bottling Ventures chose not to renew its lease on South Boulevard that it decided to buy the building on Wilkinson. Kotros said the building where the Carolina Family Restaurant is located has been around since the 1930s. During a renovation a few years ago, workers discovered a picture window, indicating that it was once a resort. -service.

Carolina_Family_Restaurant-00131.jpg
Maria Kotros and Gus Garvrilis are the siblings who own the Carolina Family Restaurant. Alex Cason Photography Charlotte five

What to eat

Some of the Carolina Family Restaurant’s best sellers include beef tips, country fried steaks, burgers, and Philly sandwiches, but that wasn’t always the plan. “We originally served Greek food – authentic, homemade Greek food,” Kotros said. “But the demand was not there. People wanted meat and three (vegetables).

There are still hints of Greek influence, however. Kotros takes pride in the restaurant’s homemade salad dressings, including the Greek dressing that her father agreed to share with her only after her health deteriorated.

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A grilled chicken salad at Carolina Family Restaurant. Alex Cason Photography Charlotte five

There is no shortage of comfort food. On my visit, daily specials included a large bacon cheeseburger, grilled cheese sandwich, and homemade vegetable soup, as well as pork chops with rice and gravy. Breakfast specials are equally generous, including eggs, bacon, sausage, rolls, oatmeal, homemade fries, and grated hash browns.

Everyone I’ve spoken to has mentioned the beef tips so they’re on my radar to give it a try soon. If you go for lunch make sure you save room for dessert – ultimate chocolate cake and strawberry cheesecakes were on the menu when I went.

Carolina_Family_Restaurant-00004.jpg
Beef tips at the Carolina Family Restaurant. Alex Cason Photography Charlotte five

For decades, newcomers and regulars have been returning for much-requested American dishes. The restaurant has also seen its fair share of celebrities over the years. University of Miami women’s basketball coach Katie Meier stopped by a few weeks ago, former governor Pat McCrory has had dinner several times and actor Zach Galifianakis has already had a meal there. -low. (When told he looked like Galifianakis, without revealing his identity, the comedian replied, “I understand a lot.”

Like a big family

Kotros grew up in the restaurant and remembers standing on a carton of milk to do the dishes when it was understaffed. Her teenage children are now helping out on the weekends, coming full circle. “My dad lived and breathed this restaurant,” Kotros said. “He never took time off. Same for me, it’s a lot of work, but I love it.

The majority of breakfast patrons are regulars. Many of them wait outside when the doors open at 6 a.m., largely because of customer service. “We want to know the names and order the oddities,” Kotros said. “When you walk in here you should feel right at home. ”

Carolina_Family_Restaurant-09973.jpg
The dining rooms of the Carolina Family Restaurant. Alex Cason Photography Charlotte five

Apparently it works – Kaye Cain was greeted by all the hostesses in the restaurant as she brought her great-grandson to pick up a take-out order. “I’ve been a regular since the day they opened,” Cain told CharlotteFive. “It’s like a big family. I tell everyone to come here, and I bring people here. It’s family and food to me.

Carolina_Family_Restaurant-00054.jpg
The Carolina Family Restaurant gyroscope. Alex Cason Photography Charlotte five

Caroline family restaurant

Location: 4600, boul. Wilkinson, Charlotte, North Carolina 28208

Neighborhood: West Charlotte / Westerly Hills

Menu

Cuisine: American, comfort cuisine

Hours: Monday to Saturday, 6 a.m. to 2 p.m.

To order: dine on site or call 704-394-9249 for pickup


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Philip’s work with the city connects him to the neighborhoods of Charlotte. Outside of the clock, he often explores public art, plays outside, or tries out new dishes. Follow him on Twitter @philipfreeman


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Editorial: Restaurant industry feeling the effects of labor shortages https://mangomikes.com/editorial-restaurant-industry-feeling-the-effects-of-labor-shortages/ https://mangomikes.com/editorial-restaurant-industry-feeling-the-effects-of-labor-shortages/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 23:22:00 +0000 https://mangomikes.com/editorial-restaurant-industry-feeling-the-effects-of-labor-shortages/ “Now Hiring”, “Help Wanted”, followed by text outlining how much the job will pay an hour (and a signing bonus!). We’ve all seen these signs in restaurants over the past few months, from fast food outlets to family favorites. Staff shortages that many restaurants experience negatively affect the services they provide, whether it’s limited hours […]]]>

“Now Hiring”, “Help Wanted”, followed by text outlining how much the job will pay an hour (and a signing bonus!). We’ve all seen these signs in restaurants over the past few months, from fast food outlets to family favorites.

Staff shortages that many restaurants experience negatively affect the services they provide, whether it’s limited hours of operation, slower service rates, or increased menu prices. .

Therefore, we shouldn’t be too surprised if we don’t get the service we usually expect.

This was the case for some restaurants located near the UNC. For example, Omar Castro, co-owner of Breadman’s, couldn’t comment on the Carolina Alumni Review during a busy brunch because the restaurant was so understaffed that he personally had to wait for tables.

Another example is Dame’s Chicken and Waffles, located on Franklin Street. Even with the lifting of COVID-19 restrictions earlier this year, the restaurant struggled with opening hours and was understaffed. Dame’s was open for lunch on weekdays and only extended its hours of operation after hiring new employees.

These examples show that while things may seem to be gradually returning to normal, some aspects can be affected for a long time, even after the worst of the pandemic has passed.

The United States Bureau of Labor reported that employment in food service establishments in May was still 1.5 million jobs below pre-pandemic levels, down about 12%.

There is not a definitive cause for the labor shortage, and it has become a point of political contention. Republicans argue that the unemployment benefits the government provided during the pandemic is preventing people from returning to work. Meanwhile, Democrats argue that the often low minimum wage for working in restaurants discourages potential workers from returning.

However, another explanation is that the problem lies with the industry itself, and the effects of the pandemic have simply made the problems more apparent.

Many restaurant jobs are very stressful and often have long, rigid hours for low wages and few benefits. These people also deal with rude customers who will blame their frustrations on the employees without a second thought. Additionally, many people might not be comfortable working indoors and interacting with significant numbers of people while the pandemic still exists.

According to a survey conducted by Joblist, half of former hospitality workers said they would not return to their previous jobs, and a third of respondents said they would not fully return to the industry, citing reasons such as wanting a higher salary, better benefits and a new work environment.

As customers, we shouldn’t so easily eliminate our frustrations with restaurant staff as they might have to do multiple people’s jobs while enduring the burden of rude customers and long shifts to make up for the reduced number. of employees.

The obvious solution to the restaurant workforce shortage is to increase wages and benefits, as many restaurants have already done. However, it could also mean an increase in the prices that customers have to pay – something that Chipotle made headlines for when he announced he was raising prices by around 4% to counter an hourly wage increase. average of $ 15.

While many of us will lament that we have to pay a little more for food from the places we love, this might be the only way restaurants can attract more workers again. This may be the new normal.

@dthopinion

opinion@dailytarheel.com

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Restaurants, reduce your costs on a variety of services with just one click https://mangomikes.com/restaurants-reduce-your-costs-on-a-variety-of-services-with-just-one-click/ https://mangomikes.com/restaurants-reduce-your-costs-on-a-variety-of-services-with-just-one-click/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 11:59:30 +0000 https://mangomikes.com/restaurants-reduce-your-costs-on-a-variety-of-services-with-just-one-click/ (RestaurantNews.com) Receive competitive quotes for some of your most expensive business functions without speaking to a flock of salespeople. Our payroll, credit card processing, employee benefits, HR, workers’ compensation and PEO partners offer some of the lowest costs in the world. We offer you a personalized service to put you in touch with the best […]]]>

Restaurants, reduce your costs on a variety of services with just one click(RestaurantNews.com) Receive competitive quotes for some of your most expensive business functions without speaking to a flock of salespeople. Our payroll, credit card processing, employee benefits, HR, workers’ compensation and PEO partners offer some of the lowest costs in the world.

We offer you a personalized service to put you in touch with the best providers. Fill out a short form and we will contact you to assess your needs. Then we will match you with the best suppliers. You’ll find the perfect rates and services without having to answer dozens of calls.

Our concierge service can match you with services in:

Professional Organization of Employers (OEP):
PEOs help streamline employee functions so businesses can focus on what they do best – generating revenue. In addition to managing the payroll process, PEOs provide savings with worker compensation, major medical and financial planning, and more.

Outsourcing of human resources:
Are you struggling to keep up with constantly changing federal and state labor laws? Our offsite HR partners can help you manage everything, protect you from potential breaches and fines, and provide security and peace of mind.

Social advantages:
Let’s face it, it’s an employee market. Labor shortages are forcing companies to scramble to attract and retain talent. A strong benefits program is the key to healthy and happy employees and our partners can provide you with the best prices and services.

Payroll processing:
Are the ever-changing state and federal mandates making payroll a headache? Our partners make payroll a snap, ensuring your employees are paid on time while keeping you compliant with all laws and mandates.

Workers compensation:
Most states require a business to have workers’ compensation for good reason. Our partners offer a variety of options to help you make the best decision for your employees and your business.

Credit card processing:
With so many companies, how do you choose the best? We have done the hard work of researching and finding the best suppliers. Find your perfect match and take the opportunity to expand the services you receive with all-in-one time and attendance management, employee tracking, payroll processing and more.

Contact:
Ken roberts
Bisfits.com
772-696-0918
ken@bisfits.com



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New mobile barbecue in town https://mangomikes.com/new-mobile-barbecue-in-town/ https://mangomikes.com/new-mobile-barbecue-in-town/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 21:33:02 +0000 https://mangomikes.com/new-mobile-barbecue-in-town/ A new luxury food truck on the north side of Schenectady – Crazy House Barbecue – serves homemade food at a time when the pandemic has done a catering job for both sit-down restaurants and walk-in food trucks. But townspeople Gladys and Thomas Fogarty saw an opportunity and opened their new food truck on Maxon […]]]>

A new luxury food truck on the north side of Schenectady – Crazy House Barbecue – serves homemade food at a time when the pandemic has done a catering job for both sit-down restaurants and walk-in food trucks.

But townspeople Gladys and Thomas Fogarty saw an opportunity and opened their new food truck on Maxon Road Extension where they cook and serve homemade barbecues and other delicacies from their mobile kitchen.

Their Crazy House Barbecue is one of only 32 active mobile licenses in Schenectady County that covers food trucks, carts and trailers. After a tedious bureaucratic process and a complex inspection, the Fogartys were able to obtain the necessary permits to obtain a full license.

Although Thomas and Gladys both prepare the food, Thomas maintains that Gladys is the face of the operation. The entire Crazy House Barbecue menu is prepared by the couple. The Fogartys prepare a wide assortment of meals, although their in-store menu changes daily.

“Breakfast is consistent, we prepare sausage, ham, bacon, eggs and cheese daily. Lunch is always new. Pulled pork is a community favorite, although we make brisket, smoked pulled chicken, various sandwiches, salads, baked beans and more, ”Gladys noted. The Fogartys have said their barbecue tastes better than most because of the rare and unique method they use.

“Our food is not cooked with propane, charcoal or gasoline. We let all of our homemade food and rubs marinate overnight, then smoke them only with apple wood. It creates amazing quality unlike the usual burnt or grilled taste. I find it funny because my wife doesn’t eat barbecue, but she will eat hers, ”said Thomas.

Crazy House Barbecue is open seven days a week, with an early morning start time at 7:30 a.m. and an afternoon closing at 2:30 p.m. rib dinner. “We’re not trying to hurt anyone’s pockets, we would like to do something for the community. A full meal that includes a sandwich, side dish of your choice and a drink costs $ 12 and we also have smaller portions. Gladys said.

Gladys has long been involved in the restaurant industry. Originally from Albany, Gladys has been involved in the restaurant industry for 30 years holding a multitude of jobs, including a stint of several years at Fort Drum for the Department of Labor. In 2005, Gladys took a position with KBR, a global engineering, construction, technology and services company, where she worked in Iraq, serving food to American soldiers. There was a twinkle in her eyes as Gladys spoke about her current accomplishments and what she had had to go through to get to this place.

“I’ve been doing this my whole life. For years, I have dreamed of owning my own restaurant. I had a serious motorcycle accident, but I’m fine now. I really appreciate my husband for helping me set this up, ”Gladys said.

Thomas, a retired electrician from Troy, personally handcrafted the entire Crazy House Barbecue mobile kitchen. The interior of Crazy House is fitted with tiled floors, ventilation, a double sink, a refrigerator and several burners, all connected to an external generator.

“Everything is done by hand, from the panels to the car. It’s my wife’s baby, I’m just happy to be a part of it,Thomas said.

The couple started their mobile catering business last June at the Harley Rendezvous Classic, an annual three-day event that attracts bikers from across the country. The event was held at the Indian Lookout Country Club in Pattersonville and was a success for the well-received barbecue offerings from the Fogartys. The reception prompted the Fogartys to vigorously seek a permanent location for their settlement. They surveyed the neighborhoods of their hometown of Schenectady to find a more permanent location for their food truck.

They found a home at Fratelli Fabrication Inc., a commercial metal fabrication company located on the extension of Maxon Road.

“Thank goodness for these boys. They recognized that we had a dream and were kind enough to help us make it come true. Gladys said.

The Bogdon brothers, Dante and Dylan, owners and operators of Fratelli Fabrication, allowed the Fogartys to park their mobile kitchen on their land.

“They are nice people and the food is good, really good,” said Dante.

“They haven’t made us pay anything yet. If we start doing well in a few months, we can give them some of the profits. Said Gladys. “We give them breakfast and lunch every day because we are so grateful to them.”

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No closures in Tarrant County restaurant health inspections https://mangomikes.com/no-closures-in-tarrant-county-restaurant-health-inspections/ https://mangomikes.com/no-closures-in-tarrant-county-restaurant-health-inspections/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 09:35:34 +0000 https://mangomikes.com/no-closures-in-tarrant-county-restaurant-health-inspections/ Stanley k patz Getty Images No restaurants were closed during health inspections conducted across Tarrant County between September 7 and 11, according to Tarrant County Health Department data compiled by the Star-Telegram. The Tarrant County Department of Health conducts restaurant inspections throughout the county, with the exception of Fort Worth, Arlington, Euless, and North Richland […]]]>

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No restaurants were closed during health inspections conducted across Tarrant County between September 7 and 11, according to Tarrant County Health Department data compiled by the Star-Telegram.

The Tarrant County Department of Health conducts restaurant inspections throughout the county, with the exception of Fort Worth, Arlington, Euless, and North Richland Hills.

Inspectors visited 116 restaurants during the last published inspection period, including follow-ups at Chuys in Richland Hills and a Taco Bueno in Watauga.

Both restaurants have been allowed to reopen.

Tarrant County restaurant inspections judge establishments on a system of unfitness. Any catering establishment that scores more than 29 demerit points requires a follow-up inspection. No serious health violations were noted by inspectors during this period of inspection of the restaurant.

Here are the inspection notes and infractions for the restaurants that Tarrant County Public Health (TCPH) inspected for the week of September 7-11, 2021. TCPH inspects and scores all restaurants in Tarrant County except those located in Fort Worth, Arlington, Euless and North Richland Hills. Scores are based on a demerit system. When the total exceeds 29, a follow-up inspection is required. To search for restaurant inspections, enter a keyword or the restaurant name. You can also sort by score.

This story was originally published September 19, 2021 4:35 am.

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James Hartley is a news reporter for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. He is passionate about true stories, movies, baseball and great hot tea. You can connect with James on Twitter @ByJamesHartley or Instagram @JamesTakesPhotos. | Want reporters like James to help you stay informed about your community? You can help Star-Telegram continue to deliver great local, business, political, sports and cultural news by purchasing a digital or print subscription today.


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restaurants brace for more vaccine abuse https://mangomikes.com/restaurants-brace-for-more-vaccine-abuse/ https://mangomikes.com/restaurants-brace-for-more-vaccine-abuse/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 23:12:16 +0000 https://mangomikes.com/restaurants-brace-for-more-vaccine-abuse/ Hospitality and tourism workers have learned to see themselves as frontline workers during the pandemic – in the face of face masks and resistant to QR codes, for example – but the vaccine rollout has made the battle lines even more difficult. more difficult. On the one hand, service staff and business owners believe vaccines […]]]>

Hospitality and tourism workers have learned to see themselves as frontline workers during the pandemic – in the face of face masks and resistant to QR codes, for example – but the vaccine rollout has made the battle lines even more difficult. more difficult.

On the one hand, service staff and business owners believe vaccines provide a safe path to the certainty they need. On the other, those who oppose vaccination against COVID-19 in general or the “segregation” imposed by vaccine passports.

While restaurants in Sydney and Melbourne remain closed during the lockdown, the site of the dispute is social media. But when businesses reopen, some operators fear their front desk staff could be subjected to in-person abuse.

Jorge Farah (left) and Ibby Moubadder would welcome public health orders making it clear that restaurants follow the rules rather than imposing their own policies.
Photo: Supplied



Last weekend, a battleground erupted over Sydney’s restaurant Aria’s Instagram account when a report announced that reservations would be open to fully vaccinated diners from Sydney’s scheduled opening day on October 18. .

The post was peppered with more than 10,000 comments, some happy to dine again at Matt Moran’s flagship fine-dining restaurant, but many others expressing their horror at the “discrimination” of excluding the unvaccinated.

In a typical comment, an Instagram user wrote: “Will you also need proof of flu vaccination? Other communicable diseases?

Many have made comparisons to Nazism and racial discrimination. “Have you dusted off the” Whites only “sign to make it more modern? Another user asked.

“Aria was crucified,” said Jorge Farah, managing director of the Esca Group, which owns restaurants in Sydney including Cuckoo Callay, Nour and Henrietta.

“I was really surprised by this. No restaurant ever thought they would monitor this level of activity. We agree with their position, but we think it’s best to stay quiet until then. that the government give firmer instructions. “

Farah would welcome public health orders making it clear that restaurants follow the rules rather than imposing their own policies.

“It’s wrong for a business owner to have to manage something like this,” he says. “We will be more confident knowing that the government is backing us and we are just regurgitating the rules. Restaurants have always followed the conditions. It will be just another layer.”

Even so, Farah expects her staff to feel warmth. “It’s a concern,” he says. “It may be more difficult for our hosts and managers to manage the door. We may be pushed back and see a drop in sales, but people will get used to it.”

It’s not just the restaurants waiting for clarity. Michelle Bishop is the owner of Bangalay Luxury Villas on the South Coast of New South Wales. She is worried about the additional obligations that any health ordinance could impose on her accommodation and catering business.

“We have a very open place where people walk outside the beach for take-out coffee,” she says. “Will they need a vaccination passport for this? It is difficult without a public health prescription, but we fear that we will have to impose changes in our activities that cost us money.”

Hash Tayeh has 11 Burgertory stores in Melbourne. It does not plan to exclude unvaccinated diners unless the government requires it.

“I’m vaccinated but I don’t want to take sides,” he says. “We just want to serve our customers and greet people through the doors. Pro-vax and anti-vax is a gruesome fight that causes division – do you really want to discuss politics with your clients? “

Tayeh would accede to any government mandate. “We will obey the law,” he says, although he predicts that all laws will always be a matter of contention for his quick service restaurants.

“People can order online, pay online and then come in to pick up the food,” he says. “What if they come in and they’re not vaccinated? They say they can’t have their food? We don’t want to make enemies of the public.”

Burgertory would train his workforce to defuse any flash point. “You can’t expect a 16-year-old to face it without support,” says Tayeh. “We do a lot of coaching and scripting. We teach our staff how to decline service in a way that doesn’t offend the other side.”

This is exactly the right approach, according to psychologist Rhonda Andrews, founder of the Barrington Center, who has developed a mental wellness framework for hospitality businesses.

“Hospitality staff don’t go to work to be mistreated,” she says. “It’s important that they are trained not to get into arguments with clients about views on vaccinations. It’s a lose-lose.

“They should keep a calm demeanor and a calm voice and also have a script prepared by the employer that says the requirements are from the government, they are not specific to this location.”

Andrews also recommends cheerful and explanatory signage, senior management on hand, and online reservations requiring agreement on terms to make a reservation.

Hardware Societe in Katherine Place, pictured before COVID.

Hardware Societe in Katherine Place, pictured before COVID. Photo: Eddie Jim

Di Keser has Hardware Societe cafes in Melbourne and also in Paris, where restaurant patrons must present a vaccination passport.

“You come to the door, we scan your passport, you get a tick,” she said. “It’s QR-based and it’s not difficult. There hasn’t been any setback at all.”

Keser had the experience of being trolled on social media when she posted an article in favor of vaccination. “I was bombarded with horrible vitriolic content so I turned off comments,” she says. “I have no tolerance for this. I want to live as before. This is our only way out.”

She is also uncompromising if customers make fuss in cafes. “My staff can call the police, it’s that easy,” she said. “We’ve always had a policy that if customers are unfriendly or rude, they can leave.”

Analysis and anecdotal evidence suggests that online anti-vaccine roadblocks may not come from a company’s customers in the first place.

Eloise Glenane owns the Montague Hotel in South Melbourne, which was stacked when it was posted on Instagram in support of the vaccination.

“The people came and were awful, but I realized I didn’t know them from a bar of soap,” she says. “They say ‘I’ll never be back’ but they never came in the first place. I have no concerns about alienating our actual customers.”

The co-owners of the Montague Hotel, siblings Eloise and Patrick Glenane have received a negative reaction to their pro-vaccine stance.

The co-owners of the Montague Hotel, siblings Eloise and Patrick Glenane, have drawn negative attention for supporting the vaccinations. Photo: Eamon Gallagher

A spokesperson for Instagram, owner of Instagram, said: “There is no room for bullying or harassment of any kind on Instagram and we delete it whenever we find it… We also ban content that advocates or promotes that others do not get the COVID. -19 vaccine. “

The company also notes that negative comments often come from people “who just pile up in the moment.”

Hundreds of comments expressing anti-vax sentiments on Aria’s Instagram post come from private, foreign, or new accounts with few followers, likely created for the sole purpose of trolling. Numerous allegations of discrimination and “segregation” have also been published by self-proclaimed “welfare” advocates.

Instagram points to new protection tools such as “Limits” that automatically hide comments from users who do not follow, or who have only recently followed, the account.

Fake reviews are another scourge, with Aria receiving a one-star rating on Tripadvisor for her booking position. Tripadvisor removed the notice after being alerted, noting that its policies have been updated for COVID-19.

“We will remove any content that encourages people to ignore government guidelines or restrictions (…)

Ladro Tap has been the subject of abusive comments via Google.

Ladro Tap has been the subject of abusive comments via Google. Photo: Supplied

Pizzeria Ladro in Melbourne spoke out in favor of the vaccination and was subsequently targeted on Google with one-star reviews and offensive comments on Friday. One user wrote: “a disgusting establishment wishing people death”.

Ladro owner Ingrid Langtry believes a recent wave of teardowns originated in Sydney from people who have never visited her restaurant.

“Some of the vitriolic abuse we’ve been subjected to is so wrong it’s disturbing,” she says. “Taking a pro-vaxxer stance and trusting science is not marginal, it is the view of the vast majority.”

Di Keser says “Ultimately these Keyboard Warriors are here to cause trouble and they are the least of your worries in the real world. It is much more important to me that our loyal customers know that we are very serious about it. about COVID measures like vaccination. “


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Mexican restaurant Flint reopens after cooling equipment theft https://mangomikes.com/mexican-restaurant-flint-reopens-after-cooling-equipment-theft/ https://mangomikes.com/mexican-restaurant-flint-reopens-after-cooling-equipment-theft/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 19:57:00 +0000 https://mangomikes.com/mexican-restaurant-flint-reopens-after-cooling-equipment-theft/ FLINT, MI – La Azteca restaurant in Flint has fully reopened after the popular Flint restaurant closed due to the theft of cooling equipment from the building’s roof. The restaurant at 1902 West Court St. in Flint reopened on Thursday, September 16 and resumed normal opening hours with full catering, La Azteca owner Daniel Mancia […]]]>

FLINT, MI – La Azteca restaurant in Flint has fully reopened after the popular Flint restaurant closed due to the theft of cooling equipment from the building’s roof.

The restaurant at 1902 West Court St. in Flint reopened on Thursday, September 16 and resumed normal opening hours with full catering, La Azteca owner Daniel Mancia told MLive-The Flint Newspaper.

The business closed earlier this week after vandals raided the business roof on Sunday, September 12 and stole cooling equipment essential to the operation of the restaurant’s coolers and air conditioning.

Related: Theft of cooling equipment temporarily closes famous Mexican restaurant Flint

Mancia said she rented a cold room and bought a temporary air conditioner and fans so her business could continue to operate while waiting for permanent equipment to arrive and be installed.

Contractors working with the company believe the equipment was stolen for scrap metal, the owner said.

The scrap would be worth $ 200 at most, but the theft caused approximately $ 60,000 in damages.

However, Mancia said the insurance would cover a large part of the losses.

It is not known when the relevant equipment will be replaced, he said.

Mancia said he submitted a report to the Flint Police Department, but there was no update on the case.

The owner thanked his loyal customers for their continued support and encouraged people to patronize the restaurant.

Learn more about MLive:

Welcome Back Fall Fest at Flint Invites Middle and High School Students for DJs, Free Food, and Games

Food Truck Friday in downtown Flint for tacos, fries, hot dogs and more

Superheroes prepare for a Flint run to help raise funds for abused children

Flint Eats hosts launch party for app that connects residents to healthy eating

The Fiesta Mexicana in the Flint region brings together Mexican community and culture


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