Restaurant Service – Mango Mikes http://mangomikes.com/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 05:41:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mangomikes.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Restaurant Service – Mango Mikes http://mangomikes.com/ 32 32 This is the restaurant Dublin has been waiting for – The Irish Times https://mangomikes.com/this-is-the-restaurant-dublin-has-been-waiting-for-the-irish-times/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 05:01:44 +0000 https://mangomikes.com/this-is-the-restaurant-dublin-has-been-waiting-for-the-irish-times/ The park cafe Address: 1 Ballsbridge, Shelbourne Road, Dublin 4, D04 R5W8 Telephone: 01 964 3040 Kitchen: Classic Cost: €€€ An omelet is the kind of skill test you’ll likely see on MasterChef, not an entree on a restaurant menu. This is not a dish that will sit on the pass waiting for another entree […]]]>

The park cafe

Address: 1 Ballsbridge, Shelbourne Road, Dublin 4, D04 R5W8

Telephone: 01 964 3040

Kitchen: Classic

Cost: €€€

An omelet is the kind of skill test you’ll likely see on MasterChef, not an entree on a restaurant menu. This is not a dish that will sit on the pass waiting for another entree to be ready. So good that we ordered the no-cook crab salad (€16) as well as Peter’s omelette with Bordeaux snail from Inis (€16) in one of Dublin’s newest restaurants, the Park Cafe in Ballsbridge, the former home of Dylan McGrath’s Shelbourne Social, now in the care of Richard Corrigan.

What happens is perfection. It is delicately folded, with a creamy egg oozing from the center. A scintillating bordelaise sauce with snail nuggets flanks each side of the Corleggy-dusted omelet. It’s not a dish made for Instagram: it’s made to be eaten. The snails come from Peter Monaghan in Cavan, just a few miles from Corrigan’s Virginia Park Lodge, not frozen snails trucked in from France. They have been blanched twice, stripped of their shells, then introduced into a Bordeaux that has a long and hedonistic relationship with wine.

I dine with a dear friend, Ernie Whalley, the former Sunday Times food critic in Ireland, who is encyclopedic when it comes to classics. We had little doubt the food was going to be good – Corrigan is in the kitchen with his sleeves rolled up and his arms burnt – but we weren’t exactly expecting that nostalgic kick with certain dishes.

The crab is tasty – sweet, with celeriac mixed with mustard; it might be a neat enough helper, but Liberty Wines’ exquisite Tuscan olive oil and focaccia are at your fingertips. If you’ve ever wondered what a quality olive oil looks like, this is your go-to.

The “La Jammet” kebab (€24) is one of those old classics that none of us had tasted before. Based on the ‘Turkish-style’ kebab, it’s a recipe Corrigan learned while studying at Cathal Brugha Street with PJ Dunne, the former chef of Jammet’s restaurant in Dublin. Kidneys, liver and marinated cubes of Old Castle Hill lamb are tangy on a large skewer, sitting alongside two chops over spiced roasted vegetables, pumpkin dhal and raita. Enough to feed a small family, so you can barely finish the roasted root vegetables (€5) and fries (€6).

Our other main course is the fillet of black sole (€29), cooked with tearful precision, but there’s a buttermilk beurre blanc to drizzle over fish fillets, sandwiched with a delicate mushroom duxelle.

A Didier Desvignes Fleurie (€56) is recommended, served slightly chilled, in a list that we are told will have a few more bottles at the more accessible end. Looking around room D4, however, there are plenty of people likely to make their way through this pricey but beautiful roster, which pushes ubercool producers Ulysse Collin, La Stoppa and Jura against old-school classics.

The desserts are affordable and accessible. The steamed pudding (€6) with custard, cream and a baptism of caramel tastes like the pudding of your childhood, but not with caramel back then.

The Park Cafe, or TPC as I’m sure it will be known, opened its doors after a year of scrutiny. I don’t know what caused it. Maybe it’s Brexit, or maybe Dublin is where all the celebrity chefs want to be right now. But it’s not as simple as that. Getting it here is one of those hard-to-define intangibles. But I think it comes down to commitment as well as skill.

Corrigan has been in the kitchen, training chefs and sending troops from London to make sure what he throws out here is something he can handle. He’s not a franchise boss, and I’m not sure he needs the heartache of a new outpost. Still, it looks like he’s coming home, and it’s a really nice way to do it.

This is the kind of good food I like to see. My budget may not extend to the Burgundies on this fine wine list, but I want to eat all the dishes on this menu. It’s not only good value for money, but also money well spent. This is the restaurant Dublin has been waiting for.

Dinner for two with a bottle of wine and 10% included service charge was €173.

THE VERDICT: Good food without nonsense or bravado

Music: Background, Portishead and a mix

Source of food: Virginia Park Lodge vegetables and pork, Kelly oysters, Frank Hederman salmon

Vegetarian options: Limit. Pickled Beets, Leaves and Nuts Burrata and Virginia Park Lodge; Jerusalem artichoke soup, Caesar salad; kale and potato gnocchi

Wheelchair access: Accessible, with accessible washrooms

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Customer says ‘I’d rather die’ after visiting Jamie Oliver’s restaurant in Budapest https://mangomikes.com/customer-says-id-rather-die-after-visiting-jamie-olivers-restaurant-in-budapest/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 09:21:15 +0000 https://mangomikes.com/customer-says-id-rather-die-after-visiting-jamie-olivers-restaurant-in-budapest/ Photo: Instagram/Tripadvisor Jamie Oliver is a household name in the culinary world. From cooking videos on YouTube to owning restaurants around the world, the chef has touched every space of the kitchen world. However, that doesn’t make it immune to bad reviews. Recently, Jamie Oliver’s Diner in Budapest got a bunch of bad ratings. A […]]]>

Photo: Instagram/Tripadvisor

Jamie Oliver is a household name in the culinary world. From cooking videos on YouTube to owning restaurants around the world, the chef has touched every space of the kitchen world. However, that doesn’t make it immune to bad reviews. Recently, Jamie Oliver’s Diner in Budapest got a bunch of bad ratings. A customer said he would rather die than return to the restaurant.

The savage review on Tripadvisor said: “I thought Jamie Oliver was famous for helping kids eat better in food cafeterias. Well, probably he did. All the bad food he took to the cafeteria that he brought to the table of this restaurant (sic).”

The customer added: “The salads were sweet, the sweet potatoes looked like they were made from cake batter, and the sauces were sweet. I will send my hospital the diabetes bill. This restaurant was truly an experience. asked if I would repeat it I will gladly say: I prefer to die.

Jamie Oliver39s Dinner in Budapest
Photo: Tripadvisor

Well, there were more reviews of the same tone.

One said: “Drinks arrived wrong and had to wait for them to be changed. It took 1h20 for the food to arrive. No service! Food overcooked. Don’t waste your time.”

A third person wrote, “I waited over an hour and a half for a burger, fries and chicken dishes. When it finally arrived the chicken was raw, bloody and cold inside. The food and service is an insult to the food industry and surely has nothing to do with the man himself Jamie Oliver. The sets may look nice but believe me, avoid this place like the plague – it’s terrible! (sic)”

Another customer warned people against visiting the restaurant. “Avoid this place like the plague,” the boss wrote. Another person called it the “worst restaurant in Budapest”.

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Miso Robotics launches in the UK with Flippy 2 https://mangomikes.com/miso-robotics-launches-in-the-uk-with-flippy-2/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://mangomikes.com/miso-robotics-launches-in-the-uk-with-flippy-2/ Flippy the bot fills UK fast food job gap as company begins accepting European investment bookings for Series E+ LONDON, November 18, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Today, Miso Robotics – the company transforming the restaurant industry through robotics and intelligent automation – launched in the UK bringing its flagship product, Flippy 2, has a Midlands subsidiary […]]]>

Flippy the bot fills UK fast food job gap as company begins accepting European investment bookings for Series E+

LONDON, November 18, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Today, Miso Robotics – the company transforming the restaurant industry through robotics and intelligent automation – launched in the UK bringing its flagship product, Flippy 2, has a Midlands subsidiary of one of the biggest fast food chains (QSR) in the world. Alongside its move to the UK, Miso Robotics has extended its Series E round and will now accept investment bookings from people in the region – aiming to raise £1.5m in capital via the crowdfunding site European Crowdcube.

Flippy 2, a robotic solution capable of independently doing the work of an entire frying station, has proven to improve operations in QSRs by reducing order-to-delivery time, while increasing food consistency and creating a better working environment for human team members. Flippy is able to run fry stations, which frees up human staff members to be redeployed and focus on other, more fulfilling tasks in the kitchen and restaurant, like interacting with customers at the drive-thru or at the door. box.

As the UK takeaway food delivery market grows from £10.5bn to £13.3bn between 2021 and 2022, the industry faces a jobs gap that Flippy can help to fill. to fill – especially with nearly 150,000 vacancies in the UK hospitality sector at present.

Flippy 2 is already used by major US fast food chains such as White Castle, Jack in the Box, Inspire Brands (the parent company of Buffalo Wild Wings, Arby’s and Sonic), Wings and Rings and Wing Zone. The UK launch is Miso’s first Flippy unit to be installed outside of the US. To date, Flippy has cooked over 400,000 pounds of fried food over nearly 31,000 hours of robotic cooking. He has already learned to recognize and cook more than 45 foods. As Miso kicks off with its first UK location, plans are in place to expand to other brands throughout next year and beyond.

“Bringing Flippy to the UK is a real testament to all the hard work our team has done, both from an R&D and innovation perspective,” said Mike BellCEO of Miso Robotics. “We’ve been preparing for this moment for years and don’t take it lightly. Although this is our first international installation, rest assured Flippy 2 is battle tested and we can’t wait for UK customers experience its abilities first-hand!”

“This is an exciting step forward for the team, not least because we are going international in response to strong demand from big UK brands,” added Jacob BrewerChief Strategy Officer of Miso Robotics. “Our existing, tried and tested products are effectively able to ‘plug and play’, meaning they can be up and running quickly to help fill the current fast food jobs gap in the UK. We hope that this partnership will be the first of many in the UK market. After all, hospitality brands can benefit from the power of our flagship products immediately, with little or no adaptation.”

Miso Robotics is primarily funded by individual investors and is one of the most successful crowdfunding stories in history. With nearly 25,000 shareholders, the company has raised more than $70 million globally in crowdfunding to date. Miso plans to use the additional funds from its Series E+ expansion to continue its expansion in the UK and beyond.

About Miso Robotics

Miso Roboticsis revolutionizing commercial catering with smart automation solutions that solve some of the biggest gaps in back-end kitchen operations. Poised to make an immediate financial impact on a restaurant’s bottom line, Miso’s AI-powered platform integrates robotics, machine learning, computer vision, and data analytics to power and grow its breakthrough products. , including: Flippy 2, CookRight and Sippy.

With real industry knowledge and learnings accumulated through brand partnerships over its first five years, Miso’s products are constantly evolving to ensure consistency, increase productivity, reduce costs and improve the dining experience. global. Miso is now accepting investment reservations for its E+ series tower. To invest in the future of restaurant automation, visit: https://www.crowdcube.com/pre-reg/miso-robotics.

Miso Robotics Press Contact
Joey TelucciGoline (USA)
(650) 291-0086
[email protected]

Hannah StephensonGolin (United Kingdom)
+44(0)7870487007
[email protected]

Miso Robotics is offering securities by way of an offering statement that has been qualified by the Securities and Exchange Commission under Level II of the A regulations. A copy of the final offering circular that forms part of the statement can be obtained from: Miso Robotique

https://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1710670/000110465922012145/tm222587d2_partiiandiii.htm

SOURCE Miso Robotics

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Subway taps into unattended Grab & Go automatic fridges https://mangomikes.com/subway-taps-into-unattended-grab-go-automatic-fridges/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 21:24:31 +0000 https://mangomikes.com/subway-taps-into-unattended-grab-go-automatic-fridges/ As part of sandwich chain Subway’s efforts to bring food closer to customers, the company in September installed its first interactive, unattended smart fridge at the University of California, San Diego. The Milford, Connecticut-based brand said refrigerators are stocked daily by the franchisee’s neighboring restaurant. Related: Subway achieves record financial success with Subway Series campaign […]]]>

As part of sandwich chain Subway’s efforts to bring food closer to customers, the company in September installed its first interactive, unattended smart fridge at the University of California, San Diego.

The Milford, Connecticut-based brand said refrigerators are stocked daily by the franchisee’s neighboring restaurant.

The refrigerators feature artificial intelligence and language processing, so customers can talk to the device and ask about any of the products inside.

The weight sensor shelves ensure customers are charged correctly, the company said, and it’s a contactless, cashless transaction. It also uses UV-C light sanitization after every purchase.

The refrigerators are part of Subways’ efforts to expand into non-traditional locations.

“As more of our customers seek dining experiences to meet their ‘in-the-moment’ needs, the brand’s non-traditional locations and platforms can serve them wherever and whenever they crave Subway,” said Taylor Bennett, Vice President of Subway. non-traditional development, in a press release.

“As Subway focuses on strategic and profitable growth, there is significant opportunity to expand our footprint into non-traditional locations and for franchisees to generate additional revenue for their business,” Bennett said.

In the first three quarters of 2022, about 5,900 non-traditional locations in the United States and Canada saw an average increase of 13% in same-store sales, the company said, adding that those 5,900 locations represent about 25 % of Subway’s North American footprint.

Non-traditional locations include airports, truck stops, college campuses, convenience and gas stores, and hospitals, the company said.

Subway began piloting its Grab & Go platform in 2020. The sandwiches are prepared daily by franchisees and distributed to Subway Grab & Go outlets, including casinos, convenience and gas stations, hospitals and airports. The platform is now available in over 400 locations across North America.

The smart refrigerator since September has received positive feedback, the company said, and franchisees have expressed interest in expanding their portfolios.

“Subway Grab & Go has quickly grown in popularity as consumers are drawn to daily fresh sandwiches from a brand they know and love, over competing items that rely on a 14+ day shelf life. “, said Karla Martinez, director of the company. innovation for non-traditional development.

“As Subway continues to expand offsite concepts,” Martinez said, “customers can expect to find Subway Grab & Go and smart fridges in more convenient everyday locations like airports, college campuses and hospitals.”

Subway has over 37,000 restaurants in over 100 countries.

Contact Ron Ruggless at [email protected]

Follow him on Twitter: @RonRuggless

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Are chef-to-table meal services the future of cheffing? No restaurant? No problem. – Food https://mangomikes.com/are-chef-to-table-meal-services-the-future-of-cheffing-no-restaurant-no-problem-food/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 21:42:57 +0000 https://mangomikes.com/are-chef-to-table-meal-services-the-future-of-cheffing-no-restaurant-no-problem-food/ Chef Maribel Rivero (Photo by Jana Birchum) As someone who thinks about food most of the time and falls asleep cataloging breakfast items, I still don’t willingly accept meal planning and preparation. Not because I don’t like it. Because cooking, with laundry or lawn maintenance, is a daily task: the need to eat never stops, […]]]>

Chef Maribel Rivero (Photo by Jana Birchum)

As someone who thinks about food most of the time and falls asleep cataloging breakfast items, I still don’t willingly accept meal planning and preparation. Not because I don’t like it. Because cooking, with laundry or lawn maintenance, is a daily task: the need to eat never stops, which is why restaurants and, by extension, chefs are an integral part of our daily lives.

When the pandemic hit, many pain points in the restaurant industry emerged, and we non-industrials who still didn’t want to cook had to switch from restaurant meals to curbside delivery and to meal kits. An even easier and more appealing option after sitting in Zoom meetings all day is to buy pre-prepared meals; you just have to heat them – plate them if you have to – before scraping them.

One such ready-meal company, CookUnity, found me through an email offer in April 2022. The offer was 40% off my first order, and the tease was meals prepared by Iron Chef and longtime restaurateur Jose Garces. I eagerly signed up and learned that Chef Garces meals are only available to CookUnity customers in Brooklyn, Chicago and Philadelphia. That didn’t stop me from signing up for four meals a week and then moving up to six. The meals were all mostly delicious, out of the park, at home, all in a rich, homemade, balanced and balanced way. Perhaps because CookUnity, which calls itself the first-ever chef-to-table platform, onboards local chefs, most of whom have run their own restaurants. And yet, chefs like to cook this way.

What is a chef-to-table platform and will it change the way you eat?

What is a chef-to-table platform and will it change the way you eat? CookUnity launched in New York in 2018 and, after raising $70 million in venture funding, quietly expanded nationwide, including Austin, in the fall of 2021. CookUnity highlights connecting consumers with local chefs via an app or website. To hear it from former Austin restaurant owner and culinary educator Maribel Rivero, CookUnity’s model benefits chefs by removing tedious tasks and letting them focus on creating recipes. On the phone, Chef Rivero sounded bubbly as she talked about her experience working for the platform.

“I was one of the first to register [in Austin]. I was catering individually and I knew I couldn’t have the same litter. As an independent chef, that’s appealing.” She joined the platform in September 2021 and hasn’t looked back.

Rivero, who once owned Peruvian restaurant Manor Road Yuyo, explained the model: CookUnity provides the kitchen and buys and supplies all the food. They take care of all the logistics and packaging, including putting a photo of the specific chef’s smiley face on each box, as well as the delivery. CookUnity earns money for every meal someone orders, the chef gets a percentage, then the chefs pay their team. “They find the customers and then they let us know how many customers we have through the app. We don’t do anything but cook and take care of the labor,” Rivero said.

Chief Rebecca Meeker (Photo by John Anderson)

As executive chef of Yuyo, it took Rivero nine months to find a supplier to provide choclo, Peruvian corn. Rivero plans to bring his version of arroz con choclo, featured on Yuyo’s menu, back to CookUnity in the near future, along with the choclo provided by CookUnity.

Rivero came to the platform with eight different dinners. His dishes are simple-looking dishes, spruced up by a chef, like grilled chicken and grilled vegetables bound with rich chimichurri and mashed smoked eggplant. Rivero also offers clean, crisp renditions of the homemade Tex-Mex dishes she grew up with. She explained the reasons for her meal offerings.

“Most chefs stay in their lane or try to provide something that another chef doesn’t. But people still want their home-style classics. At first, I started with Peruvian dishes, and I I have a few favorites that I will continue. But customers are getting finicky.”

Rivero teased a Uruguayan dish she has on the platform soon: “It’s just grilled fish with a chimichurri, and rice with his own chimichurri that I presented to Yuyo, and charred tomatoes and caramelized onions. More corn in the rice!”

Like Rivero, Garces was recruited by CookUnity. I had to ask: Why would an Iron Chef with his own restaurants and website (garcesgroup.com) want to sell meals through another online platform?

He said: “I love the community aspect. There are multiple teams of chefs working together under one roof, there’s a certain camaraderie. It’s a challenge to source local and fresh ingredients, and CU takes care of that, which makes sense for all the chef teams. And during the pandemic, it wasn’t the time to go out to eat. I’m glad I got the outlet. Garces said he was surprised to find that he was planning to prepare the food in a new way.

“Cooking big meals in abundance, and making sure they are all fresh and of the same quality, there is a lot to learn. I started to think about the nutritional balance of my meals, where before I ‘stacked the taste.’ Garces eats the same CookUnity meals as anyone in her delivery area.

Chef Jose Garces (Courtesy of CookUnity)

Garces said, “I order the meals for myself, for quality assurance purposes and for my family. I think it’s good. I’m not just saying that, it’s a great homemade option.”

The chefs I spoke to seemed happy with the deal, but they had a restaurant of sorts, a national profile and various “entrepreneurial” moves before they were spotted by CookUnity. Like WeWork, the CookUnity model appears to aim to dominate the market nationally, but not just with real estate – by matching regional/local cooks with the customer.

What about a hyperlocal model, in that the heat-and-eat meals you buy in semi-bulk (4-8 meals per week) were prepared locally, by an Austin chef who grew up here and wants to live a balanced life and serve delicious food? That would be Lucky Lime, founded by Austinite Rebecca Meeker, former chef of Jeffrey’s and Josephine House. She explained her intention to prepare meals: “In 2017, I quit my job and was looking for a more balanced lifestyle. I wanted to make appetizing meals that were also healthy.”

“I like the community side. There are several teams of chefs working together under one roof, there is a certain camaraderie.
– Chef Jose Garces on selling his meals through CookUnity

She launched Lucky Lime in 2018 and currently cooks 1,000 meals a week for weekly subscribers, as well as take-out items at Thom’s Market, Tiny Grocer and Royal Blue. Or you can stop by the Lucky Lime kitchen window at GhostLine Kitchens after placing an order online through eatluckylime.com. The new platform is powered by Prado, a local company that helps meal prep businesses – which is a bit like the CookUnity model.

“It’s going well,” Meeker said modestly. And it’s not doing it alone (or with VC funding). Along with her prep team, she works with marketing, design and advertising agency Whitebox to create the branding and packaging for Lucky Lime.

But will the business model work? CookUnity just expanded to Austin. Lucky Lime only wants to serve Austin; Meeker said she might consider expanding to Houston or Dallas, but has no plans for national expansion. So I had to ask someone who long ago opted out of the convenience food delivery game what they thought of the overall business model. David Ansel of The Soup Peddler used to offer a similar ready-to-eat weekly meal delivery option, but discontinued it years ago. Ansel saw the future of the Soup Peddler as good food and fast service through convenient locations, and you know how that story turned out: they’ve become an Austin staple with five locations.

Ansel, who is quietly proud of Soup Peddler’s always fresh and healthy yet indulgent offerings, was candid when recalling his old meal program: “Well, it was sort of a failure. The logistics were tough. Our brand didn’t seem like it was embraced by younger, hipper Austinites the healthier products we offered weren’t popular We couldn’t make fresh stuff Everything was cooked, cooled, then had to be warmed up by the customer. And the customer had to place their order a week in advance.”

Well when you put it like this, the logistics seem difficult. I don’t remember ordering Soup Peddler’s meals a week in advance, I only remember being thrilled to 1) get them to my doorstep and 2) eat them. As someone who is always thinking about food, planning ahead and being rewarded with great meals is a little thrill. It’s not as exciting as eating a perfect Caribbean chicken stew with rice and peas that taste like a chef, because it is. It’s a bigger thrill, and one that has the potential to spread like wildfire among Austin’s increasingly young, affluent, and on-the-go population.

And with many restaurants and chefs digging in to fill the vacuum created by the pandemic, the CookUnity model connects eaters with chefs who find themselves “in between” restaurants, waiting for the real estate market to correct in their favor or wish to develop their catering without increasing overhead costs. And it might have no impact on the traditional restaurant model, if chefs like Jose Garces embrace it. Because the meal itself, while required multiple times a day, is no substitute for the in-person dining experience we’ve all learned during the pandemic.

That said, this model could offer a middle way not only for chefs, but also for those who want a restaurant-quality meal without having to change into their pajamas. And it’s a win for everyone.

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All Set, Miss Toya’s and Believe N Bread attend DMV Black Restaurant Week https://mangomikes.com/all-set-miss-toyas-and-believe-n-bread-attend-dmv-black-restaurant-week/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 11:55:42 +0000 https://mangomikes.com/all-set-miss-toyas-and-believe-n-bread-attend-dmv-black-restaurant-week/ All Set Restaurant & Bar, Miss Toya’s Creole House and Believe N Bread are participating in the fifth annual DMV Black Restaurant Week, which begins today and ends Sunday November 13th. Featuring this year’s theme of “reshaping our community through ownership and luxury,” the annual promotion aims to highlight Black-owned restaurants and service providers in […]]]>

All Set Restaurant & Bar, Miss Toya’s Creole House and Believe N Bread are participating in the fifth annual DMV Black Restaurant Week, which begins today and ends Sunday November 13th.

Featuring this year’s theme of “reshaping our community through ownership and luxury,” the annual promotion aims to highlight Black-owned restaurants and service providers in the DC metro area.

For us, DMVbrw isn’t just a week, it’s about impacting the community throughout the year. Our mission is to use food as a force for good and our motto is culture, education and good food. We champion the local Black-owned restaurant and food service provider, celebrate unity, inclusive for businesses that support our mission and increase the prosperity of the local economy.

All Set and Miss Toya’s will offer a $45 3-course prix fixe menu and special item options. Believe N Bread, which sells bread and baked goods at Takoma Park-Silver Spring Co-op and Main Street Pearl’s Beans not Bacon pop-up, will be offering special pick-up deals.

A full list of participating restaurants is available on the DMV Black Restaurant Week website.

Graphic: DMV Black Restaurant Week/Instagram

We’re expanding our coverage and we need your help. Click here for more information.

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Taco John’s brings more. Bolder. Better. Flavors in Michigan https://mangomikes.com/taco-johns-brings-more-bolder-better-flavors-in-michigan/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 13:34:00 +0000 https://mangomikes.com/taco-johns-brings-more-bolder-better-flavors-in-michigan/ Popular quick-service restaurant to debut in Great Lakes State with three Grand Rapids-area openings, aims to hire 150 new team members Grand Rapids, Michigan (RestaurantNews.com) In December, Grand Rapids will soon be able to Olé the day with the ValuEST menu, original tacos, fan-favorite burritos, specialty potato olés® and more at John’s Tacos The famous […]]]>

Popular quick-service restaurant to debut in Great Lakes State with three Grand Rapids-area openings, aims to hire 150 new team members

Taco John's brings more.  Bolder.  Better.  Flavors in MichiganGrand Rapids, Michigan (RestaurantNews.com) In December, Grand Rapids will soon be able to Olé the day with the ValuEST menu, original tacos, fan-favorite burritos, specialty potato olés® and more at John’s Tacos

The famous Mexican fast-food restaurant has signed franchise agreements with Meritage Hospitality Group to open three Taco John’s locations in the Grand Rapids, Michigan area. The first location will open on December 5, the second on December 12 and the third on December 19.

“We are delighted to present to you bigger. bolder. better. flavors in the Grand Rapids area,” said Meritage Hospitality Group President Gary Rose. “We plan to grow 200 Taco John’s restaurants over the next few years, but these three locations hold a very special place as they are the first in our hometown. We can’t wait to see the beginnings and look forward to our continued expansion which will bring many more employment opportunities to the community. »

The three Taco John’s in the Grand Rapids area will begin hiring this month and are looking to fill 100 to 150 entry-level to management positions.

With its fusion of distinctive flavors and spices from south of the border, Taco John’s menu features several signature dishes, including meat and potato burritos, stuffed grilled tacos, potato olés® and daring and worthy fried chicken tacos. Taco John’s offers signature specialties like Taco Tuesday® and the $1-$2-$3 ValueEST menu everyday. Download the Taco John’s app and like Taco John’s Facebook page for exclusive offers.

Learn more about visiting Taco John tacojohns.com.

Taco John's brings more.  Bolder.  Better.  Flavors in Michigan

About Taco John’s®

Founded in 1969 in Cheyenne, Wyoming, Taco John’s® serves bigger. bolder. better. flavors for over 50 years. Today, Taco John’s operates and franchises nearly 400 restaurants in 22 states, making it one of the largest Mexican fast food brands in America. With bold originals like Potato Olés®, Taco John’s knows how Olé The Day. Taco John’s is proud to serve generous portions of its signature menu items which are made to order using fresh, high quality ingredients, seasonings and sauces. The brand was ranked #7 in the “Mexican Food” category on Entrepreneur “Best Food Franchises of 2022” and was recently recognized by RSQ magazine as “Top 15 Chains Ready to Take on the Best Fast Food Players”. Taco John’s is led by CEO Jim Creel, who was named one of the “Most Influential Restaurant CEOs in the Nation” by Nation Restaurant News in 2022. For more information, visit tacojohns.com and follow Taco John’s on Facebook, instagram, Twitter and ICT Tac.

About the Meritage Hotel Group

Meritage Hospitality Group, headquartered in Grand Rapids, Michigan, is one of the nation’s leading franchise operators, with 350 restaurants and approximately 11,000 employees in 16 states across the United States. The company is one of the largest operators of Wendy’s restaurants in the world and owns several proprietary restaurant brands, including Morning Belle. The company recently entered into a development agreement to build up to 200 Taco John’s restaurants across the U.S. Midwest starting in 2022.

At the end of fiscal 2021, the Company had total diluted weighted average shares outstanding of 9,631,000 and fully diluted EPS of $1.81.

The Company’s current, publicly available information pursuant to SEC Rule 15c2-11 and FINRA Rule 6432 may be found at www.otcmarkets.comunder the ticker symbol MHGU/Disclosures or on the Company’s website, www.meritagehospitality.com.

Certain information contained in this new press release, in particular information regarding future economic and financial performance, as well as management’s plans, expectations and objectives, constitutes forward-looking statements. The factors set forth in our Safe Harbor Statement, in addition to other possible factors not listed, could affect the company’s actual results and cause those results to differ materially from those expressed in the forward-looking statements. Please see the company’s Safe Harbor Statement at http://www.meritagehospitality.com.

Contact:
Mario Zavala
Champion
214-693-4964
mzavala@championmgt.com

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Commonwealth Magazine https://mangomikes.com/commonwealth-magazine/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 01:35:42 +0000 https://mangomikes.com/commonwealth-magazine/ STATE HOUSE NEWS SERVICE REGULATIONS of environmental regulators aims to reduce food waste in the state starting in November, moving towards a goal of reducing the disposal of all waste statewide by 30% by 2030, while strengthening Massachusetts’ green economy. The Department of Environmental Protection is expanding its waste disposal bans by lowering the commercial […]]]>

STATE HOUSE NEWS SERVICE

REGULATIONS of environmental regulators aims to reduce food waste in the state starting in November, moving towards a goal of reducing the disposal of all waste statewide by 30% by 2030, while strengthening Massachusetts’ green economy.

The Department of Environmental Protection is expanding its waste disposal bans by lowering the commercial organic food waste ban threshold and adding mattresses and textiles to the list of materials prohibited from disposal or transportation for disposal in Massachusetts.

Former Governor Deval Patrick implemented the Commercial Food Waste Ban in 2014, which regulated entities that generated at least one ton of food waste per week. Under the regulations, these companies must donate, compost or otherwise reuse food, instead of sending it to landfills or incinerators.

The updated regulations will lower the threshold from Tuesday for businesses that produce at least half a ton of food waste per week.

About 2,000 businesses are subject to the current ban, said MassDEP’s deputy director for solid waste, John Fischer, and the new threshold will affect about 2,000 more businesses.

The original ban applied primarily to large entities, such as supermarkets, hospitals, hotels, colleges and food manufacturers, processors and distributors, Fischer said.

The changes coming on Tuesday will primarily affect restaurants, with around 1,300 restaurants that will be subject to the new ban. Other businesses newly subject to regulation include small manufacturers, supermarkets, hotels, nursing homes and residential facilities, elementary and secondary schools, colleges and universities, and correctional facilities.

The data used to prepare these estimates is from 2019, before the impact of COVID-19. Fischer therefore warned that the actual number of companies affected could be lower than estimates.

“The restaurant industry has been heavily impacted by COVID, so we believe in the short term it will be smaller than that,” he said, as many restaurants closed or changed their business models to give priority to takeaways, which produce less food. waste.

Boxes (left) from Food Link’s Arlington office are shown ready for delivery. The white bins (right) are filled with food waste to be composted. [Sam Drysdale/SHNS]

In addition to the positive environmental impact of creating less waste, Fischer said, the regulations have two “really significant” economic benefits.

With limited solid waste disposal capacity in the state and throughout the Northeast, the regulations will divert food waste from traditional disposal locations such as landfills and reduce the amount of waste that must be sent for disposal. in other states, he said. Additionally, trash bans are attracting new businesses to Massachusetts in the recycling, composting, and food donation industries.

“It’s innovating new small businesses, all of which tend to operate locally, create new jobs for Massachusetts, and involve the community,” he said.

The nonprofit advocacy organization MASSPIRG had advocated for a total ban on commercial food waste, said the organization’s executive director, Janet Domenitz.

When asked why the state hasn’t pursued the zero-waste ban, Fischer said Massachusetts currently doesn’t have the capacity to collect all of that food waste statewide.

“We felt that the half-ton per week threshold would allow us to continue to support it and to continue to accelerate the program that would work well for both the companies that collect this material and for the companies that have had to divert the material,” he said.

The ministry will revisit the idea of ​​a zero-waste ban in 2025 and then assess it, Fischer said.

Although there is no total ban in place in November, MASSPIRG and other environmental organizations in the Zero Waste Massachusetts coalition, which are working to reduce waste disposal, have shown their support for the regulations. adjusted as a step towards their goal.

“We need to move away from landfilling and burning, and towards reducing, reusing and composting,” said Staci Rubin of the Conservation Law Foundation. “These new bans represent progress. Communities of color and low-income residents bear the brunt of waste disposal, and every step we take to reduce disposal means a cleaner, fairer Commonwealth.

Product donations are pictured at Food Link’s Arlington office, including carrots, squash, pears and onions. [Sam Drysdale/SHNS]

Domenitz said burning and burying things that can be recycled “is like throwing away our future.”

For businesses that will be newly impacted by the food waste ban starting Tuesday, Fischer recommended visiting RecyclingWorks Massachusetts, a website that provides free assistance to businesses in Massachusetts on composting and waste reduction and a tool to help them estimate their food waste.

Elise Springuel, director of operations and community partnerships at food donation organization Food Link, said the ban will affect small businesses, which don’t have access to resources that larger businesses may have, such as facilities. on-site composting or industrial partners for organic waste.

“There are a number of solutions for businesses when it comes to reducing their food waste – they can limit their production at source and produce less food, there are composting services, anaerobic digestion, partnerships with farms and partnerships with someone like us to get the food to the people who need it,” she said. “But aside from source reduction and donation, all of these solutions often cost money, so it’s a new line item.

Springuel said that from an economic, social and environmental point of view, restaurants should look to donating food.

“We waste up to 40% of what we produce in this country, while simultaneously experiencing high rates of hunger in Massachusetts,” she said. “So we are working to solve one problem with another. We take excess food and give it to people who need it. A lot of food waste is really good food, and we’re working to get that food to the right people.

Meet the author

Journalist, State House Press Service

Food Link is based in Arlington and serves the Greater Boston area. Springuel said the nonprofit supports banning MassDEP, and she believes it’s an “important incremental step towards reducing food waste,” and that “we need to build the infrastructure to support the waste reduction if a ban is going to succeed”.

“There are a variety of new companies emerging to tackle the problem of food waste, from technology to help grocery stores place more predictable orders, to composting services that will help grow something new from your waste, or in partnership with food donation organizations, so what might have ended up in a landfill can now feed those in need,” Springuel said.

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Opening of a seafood restaurant and a raw fishmonger bar in Kirkwood in the Pratt Pullman district https://mangomikes.com/opening-of-a-seafood-restaurant-and-a-raw-fishmonger-bar-in-kirkwood-in-the-pratt-pullman-district/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 13:45:00 +0000 https://mangomikes.com/opening-of-a-seafood-restaurant-and-a-raw-fishmonger-bar-in-kirkwood-in-the-pratt-pullman-district/ Six months after finding great success with their Seafood Market and Fishmonger Cafe in Poncey-Highland, Skip Engelbrecht (8ARM) and Nhan Le (8ARM, So Ba, Octopus Bar) and Chef Bradford Forsblom are poised to open a second, much larger location this week in Kirkwood. And this one serves cocktails and includes seating for nearly 100 people […]]]>

Six months after finding great success with their Seafood Market and Fishmonger Cafe in Poncey-Highland, Skip Engelbrecht (8ARM) and Nhan Le (8ARM, So Ba, Octopus Bar) and Chef Bradford Forsblom are poised to open a second, much larger location this week in Kirkwood. And this one serves cocktails and includes seating for nearly 100 people on the patio.

Taking over building seven next to the Dailies and Sides restaurant in the Pratt Pullman neighborhood on Rogers Street, Fishmonger opens with a limited dinner menu on Thursday, October 27, followed by a full-service dinner and drinks on Friday, October 28. A daily happy hour offers half-price oysters from 5-7 p.m.

As in Poncey-Highland, people order at the counter before sitting down with their number. Servers deliver food and then float around the dining room and patio taking additional orders.

Engelbrecht describes this fishmonger as “super family-friendly,” while maintaining the hip vibe he and Le are known for creating at their other restaurants via music, relaxed atmosphere, and design. The Pratt Pullman location also includes both a raw bar and a cocktail bar that seats about five people each, with another 20 seats at tables in the dining area. The majority of seating is outside on the 100-seat patio, part of which is covered and offers fire pits for cooler evenings.

Skip Engelbrecht

Unlike Poncey-Highland, Fishmonger at Pratt Pullman does not offer a seafood market. However, Engelbrecht says they may consider introducing a market if the demand is there and plan to start offering seafood at sell weekends from a cart on the terrace in November. Late night food and drinks are also provided for weekend evenings.

Forsblom doesn’t deviate from what currently works on the Poncey-Highland menu, keeping Pratt Pullman’s food similar with delicate fillets of blackened grouper, fresh oysters, crudos and seafood salads, chowders and sandwiches. Look for seafood spins and around eight daily specials, including sandwiches like hot catfish and Frankenstein roll with pieces of crab and lobster in hot butter.

“Our specialty board at Fishmonger has really grown, so the menu is bigger now and includes about eight specialties,” says Engelbrecht. “We’re going to do the same thing here, but expand the raw bar menu a bit more.”

Caleb Grubb, who worked behind the bar at Mercury and 8ARM, becomes director of beverages for the Pratt Pullman site and also oversees indoor operations. Expect beer, wine, cocktails, and frozen drinks at the bar.

With construction of the building complete and all necessary permits in place, Engelbrecht says the restaurant design process went fairly quickly, allowing them to turn around and open in Pratt Pullman just three months after secure the space.

Early next year, the trio will open Small Fry at Atlanta Dairies on Memorial Drive, a counter-service restaurant featuring a showcase serving fried chicken and fried fish sandwiches, falafel burgers, fish nuggets and baskets of prawns. And Engelbrecht, Le and Forsblom may not be done opening other fish stores in Atlanta, including locations in Buckhead and West Atlanta.

“It’s been crazy between opening Fishmonger this spring and opening this place a few months later,” says Engelbrecht. “Fishmonger 1 is still doing great, it’s like, let’s strike while the iron is hot.”

Skip Engelbrecht

Fishmonger225 Rogers Street, Atlanta.

Tentative hours: Wednesday – Monday, 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Late night hours to come.

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My Advice to Restaurant Owners: Don’t Apologize for a Bad Yelp Review | american small business https://mangomikes.com/my-advice-to-restaurant-owners-dont-apologize-for-a-bad-yelp-review-american-small-business/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 10:01:00 +0000 https://mangomikes.com/my-advice-to-restaurant-owners-dont-apologize-for-a-bad-yelp-review-american-small-business/ RDo you remember Anton Ego, the aptly named food critic in the animated film Ratatouille? His scathing review of chef Gusteau’s restaurant arguably contributed to the chef’s death. It was only the delicious cuisine prepared by Remy – he was the rat – that saved the day for the famous Parisian restaurant. Ego represented a […]]]>

RDo you remember Anton Ego, the aptly named food critic in the animated film Ratatouille? His scathing review of chef Gusteau’s restaurant arguably contributed to the chef’s death. It was only the delicious cuisine prepared by Remy – he was the rat – that saved the day for the famous Parisian restaurant. Ego represented a cohort of food critics who dominated the restaurant industry for centuries. But where are these food critics today? Of course, there are still a few. But most of them have been outsourced by review sites like Yelp.

Yelp has become where people get their food reviews. And not just food. It’s also retailers and services. The site is said to have had 184 million reviews worldwide and 178 million unique visitors each month. About 45% of people will check a Yelp review before visiting a business. It is a great power.

But with great power comes great responsibility. And media attention. Yelp has become so powerful that fights between business owners and their disgruntled customers have become legendary — and often go viral. I love these fights. And I’m still rooting for the business owner.

I support the owner of the Fresno, Calif. daycare center who filed libel suits against customers who left bad reviews. I cheer for the owner of a Colorado sushi restaurant who regularly applauds disgruntled customers. And the vet, owner of a gun and appliance repair service, who beat the worst of their bad reviews. I’m happy for the construction company in Canada that won a $90,000 defamation lawsuit against a guy who posted negative reviews about his company. Good for them all.

During the pandemic, Yelp saw a 161% spike in negative restaurant user reviews and the platform removed over 15,000 bad user reviews related to Covid restrictions. What kind of person leaves a bad review for a struggling business during one of the worst economic disasters in recent memory? And who complains when a business owner struggles to make their establishment safe for their employees and customers? Idiots, who is it? Lots and lots of idiots who are on Yelp.

Most experts tell small businesses to be nice to these idiots. One, for example, a restaurant consultant, says you have to say “thank you”, swallow your ego and your desire to avoid conflict. “Other readers will see that you are responsive and care about your customers,” he writes.

The Industry Advisor’s opinion is the general consensus among most experts. Be nice, they say. Be professional. Respond politely. Take responsability. Acknowledge the complaint and show the public that you are aware of the problem and will fix it. But is it really good advice? No it is not. My advice: defend yourself and fight.

Fight because the public already knows the truth. A snotty critic like Anton Ego is just a small voice among thousands. And if you manage to rack up thousands — if not hundreds — of Yelp reviews and 98% of them are positive, then you’re fine. You can’t please everyone. We also know that there are plenty of losers with their own personal issues who have no better way to spend their time than to anonymously criticize a food service establishment because the soda they received didn’t have enough. of ice. We know that even Yelp — like Google and Amazon reviews — can be rigged, and some reviews are dodgy at best.

We know that some people leave bad reviews just to extort business owners, and some states like Arizona are actually taking legislative action to stop this practice. We also know that for every customer who takes the time to leave a Yelp review – positive or negative – there are tens of thousands who have better things to do with their lives than praise (or disparage) a small business owner trying to earn a living. Count me as one of them.

So don’t apologize. Don’t whine. Do not take responsibility for inaccurate and unwarranted comments. If you did something wrong, admit it and fix what you can. Otherwise, hold on. Be professional, of course. But fight back and defend your business. The audience needs to see that you’re not going to accept a bad review as fact. To me, that’s even worse than apologizing.

You are proud of your business. You depend on your business for your livelihood. You have thousands of satisfied customers. Tell the customer that you’re both better off if they go somewhere else. You prefer to serve friendly people who appreciate the products and services that you relentlessly provide. And then move on. Because you know this guy is going to want to get into an online war. He has no life. You do.

I like when the owners fight. It shows they care. So stop apologizing when you get a bad Yelp review from the Anton Egos of the world. Show the audience that you care too.

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